Tuesday, January 29, 2013

What was the P95 designed for?

return to FAQs: Ruger P95

Ruger P89
What was the P95 designed for?: Well, the first gun in Ruger's P-series pistols was the P89. The Ruger P89 was designed for the service-pistol competition to replace the 1911. The Beretta 92 won that competition and became the M9 (beating out the Sig Sauer, which was debatably the better pistol, because Beretta offered lower overall cost including parts, etc. - but that's another story). The P95 descended from the P89 and was Ruger's first polymer-framed pistol. It appeared to be an interim step, reducing production cost, weight, and using a proven fire-control system. But it also seemed to be a classic Ruger solution - time-tested functioning with advances in materials and production methods. Ruger had created classic firearms with the same methodology, for example the Mark I, Single Six, Blackhawk, No. 1, and Mini-14.

Ruger Mini-14 Ranch Rifle

So to make a long story short and actually answer the question, the Ruger P95 was an evolution of Ruger's entry in the wondernine competition, which combined our military's move to NATO-standard 9mm and  America's law-enforcement organizations move from revolvers to semi-automatic pistols. And as part of the evolution of those handguns, not only was the P95 Ruger's polymer offering, but it also was shortened to a service-length barrel of approximately 4 inches from the tactical-length 5-inch barrel - before 5-inches meant tacticool.

Glock G19
And to frame the Ruger P95 among it peers: The Ruger P95 is a basic carry pistol of the approximate size, weight, and capacity of a striker-fired Glock 19, Springfield XD Service, and M&P9, but it's old-school hammer-fired like a CZ-75 P07, EAA Witness Polymer Carry, and Sig Sauer SP2022.

Sig Sauer SP2022
And it is still the highest-quality offering for a budget-entry, service-caliber, service-size, semi-automatic, new-production handgun on the market.

return to FAQs: Ruger P95

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